Anne Hardy: Twin Fields Exhibition

Wednesday June 24, 2015

Main Image

Anne Hardy’s newest exhibition “Twin Fields” at The Common Guild, an exhibition space for visual arts projects and events, is perhaps one of the more unusual yet brilliant exhibitions you may visit while perusing the fine selection of art events the West End Festival has to offer.

Hardy, a London-based British artist, has had many solo exhibitions since 2004 where she predominantly creates large sets/environments and photographs them to create her art. These sets have been characterised as “hovering between reality and fiction”, and although never featuring people, have been described to have personas and very distinctive feels about them.


 The current feature piece as part of her newest ‘Twin Fields’ exhibition, is a stand-alone wooden box which you can enter which is fitted almost like a rural cabin in the wilderness. To create the sets, Hardy often ‘comes across’ materials and uses them in her urban scenes. All elements of the set are very carefully chosen and arranged despite their incidental appearance and this is part of the genius behind Hardy and her work. It is also a unique experience to be able to engage with such immersive art through visual, hearing, touch and smell sensations.

 Anne used to create the sets in order to photograph but as she progressed further with creating the environments, they became her art in their own right. The settings for her installations are carefully chosen as they often become part of the exhibit themselves. People who have watched Anne work describe how each piece grows and evolves, manifesting itself in the surrounding studio space. The open and spacious townhouse location for this exhibit beautifully contrasts the enclosed and rustic nature of the set on display. 

 Once exhibits are finished, they are dismantled so experience this unique exhibition while you can! Twin fields will be showing in The Common Guild until the beginning of August. More information on Hardy can be found on her website and at The Common Guild.


Daniel Irwin


Love Letters To Glasgow

Monday June 22, 2015

Main Image

Tomoe was initially drawn to Glasgow through it’s indie music scene and described herself as captivated when she heard “Biggest Bluest Hi-fi”, the debut LP from indie pop band Camera Obscura in 2001 stating “It changed my life”. In 2005 Tomoe got a student visa and came to Glasgow, still pursuing the musical scene and going to a lot of gigs during her year of residence. 

Not an arts student by trade, Tomoe picked up Photoshop, Illustrator and Dreamweaver (design software packages) while in Japan and first began making stop animation which can be seen here. From 2012 she fused this style of art with her love of Glasgow to create stunningly intricate paper-cuts of Glasgow areas and buildings.  

Chop Pop Wall Display 1

Tomoe commented “I have been visiting Glasgow once a year since 2006. I always miss it when I leave and love the local atmosphere. There is a smell about Glasgow, (not a bad one) which I always get at the airport and when walking through the streets which cannot be described by words. It makes me happy to be back and I want Glaswegians to know that I love Glasgow”

Tomoe’s “Love Letters to Glasgow” event is running until the 28th June and is free for all to visit. For more information about Tomoe Ishida and her work you can click here.


Daniel Irwin


The Key: An Art Mystery

Monday June 15, 2015

Main Image

“As a consequence of a number of discussions, over the last two years, about art with Alasdair Gray, I decided to use my knowledge of art history, and my interest in playwriting, to compose a play that really looked at his paintings and to bring those meanings to life using the dramatic potential of theatre.

Alasdair Gray’s paintings on the surface are engaging designs, but they can also reveal hidden depths of ideas and feelings, ranging from intense pain to delightful pleasure: How could these attributes be communicated in a play?

The decision to use Oscar Wilde’s infamous literary character ‘Dorian Gray’ was initially inspired by the chance association of names, but as the play demanded someone who was an art expert, he claimed the job.

Dorian gets assistance from other characters because they have intimate knowledge of the art. In consequence, the writing and the painting are brought into a close relationship and exploited by the dramatic visual and literary qualities of theatre.

Lanark and Duncan Thaw are regenerated to help Dorian Gray find the key to the meaning of Alasdair Gray’s art. However Lanark has a new dilemma and she falls in love with the beauty of Dorian Gray. Duncan Thaw on the other hand is sceptical and tests Dorian’s claims about the role of art and the beautiful as transforming experience for the individual.

Assisted by a lily, a symbol of purity and beauty they travel into the Alasdair Gray mural painting ‘Glasgow: The Triumph of Death’ in search of the key, but events overtake them and their world is turned upside down. Will art triumph over death?”

-       Duncan Comrie, writer of The Key: An Art Mystery


Showing on the 16th and 17th of June at 2.30/7.30pm, tickets are available from Mighty Fine Theatre or available on the door at Websters Theatre. 


News- WEF's opening Torchlight Procession launched

Wednesday May 1, 2013

This year’s West End Festival will be opened by an inaugural Torchlight Procession, which will start at the iconic Riverside Museum and end at one of Glasgow’s historic buildings, Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery.

Riverside Museum with Kids 2

The Torchlight Procession will take place on the evening of Saturday, 1 June and will be the first family event of the festival, bringing people together by torchlight to celebrate Glasgow’s West End.

Michael Dale, Director of the West End Festival said: “This is a real family event, signalling the first weekend and inclusiveness of the festival. Participation is the key to its success and we encourage people of all ages to join in.  The route from the Museum to the Art Gallery is doable for all ages, taking in new sites and old, including the University and Kelvingrove.

"We want people to come out for the evening with their families and feel a part of something special.”

Riverside Museum will be the host for families and participants prior to setting off on the procession with live music, entertainment and a special festival late opening night.  The mass procession of Torchbearers will then take the route from Riverside to Byres Road, University Avenue and finish at Kelvingrove Museum, where they will be met by street performers and musicians.

Torches are priced at £7 and will be available to purchase prior to the event at: