West End Festival Entertains 125,000

Sunday June 28, 2015

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Photo credit John Linton


The West End Festival, which celebrated its 20th anniversary this year, has come to an end for another year. It is estimated 125,000 people attended festival events between 5 and 28 June

The festival celebrated what has been the biggest and most enjoyed festival to-date with over 400 exhibitions, performances, talks, tours, workshops and screenings at over 80 west end venues. Many of the events are programmed free of charge to encourage a wider audience and it is estimated that *115,000 festival go-ers attended free events.

Creon Brock, music and theatre programmer for Oran Mor said, “This year’s West End Festival has been another great success at Oran Mor. We've had 38 shows across the festival, and a typically eclectic range of genres including theatre, tribute bands, folk, pop, indie, jazz, talks and poetry. The highlight of the festival at Oran Mor was our 4th annual All Dayer which took place last weekend and saw 14 Scottish bands, playing across 3 stages, all in the one building”.

Other festival highlights included the Kelpie Maquettes 'coming home' (which saw over 20,000 visit the G20 Heritage exhibition) and Mackintosh Queens Cross Summer Concert, ‘Feel the Spirit’, with globally renowned composer and conductor, John Rutter. For families, author Julia Donaldson and illustrator Nick Sharratt brought the Gruffalo to the festival, giving children the unique opportunity to meet the literary character.

Festival director, Michael Dale said: “Participants from all over the world brought events to the festival including those from Japan, Serbia, India, Russia, Germany and the USA. From the mobbed streets of Byres Road on Festival Sunday to the packed out Kelvingrove bandstand finale, we’re very pleased with WEF 2015!”

This year, the festival has been working with Yelp Glasgow, the online crowd-source review company. Yelp helped recruit over 30 citizen reporters; they attended events, wrote reviews and posted them on the dedicated WEF Yelp page. Glasgow’s blogger community also got involved on a bigger scale this year helping engage more visitors and bring them closer to the festival experience.

The website also reached record activity during the festival with 200,000 page views since 5 June and nearly 16,000 unique visitors to the website on parade day alone.

The festival would not be possible without support from key funders including the National Lottery, Glasgow City Council, Glasgow Arts and Scottish Book Trust, in addition to all local businesses and participants who contribute tremendous effort.

Festival chairman, Liz Scobie, finished, “This year has been the most fantastic and energised festival yet and I would like to thank everyone involved including funders, visitors, participants and the local community.  We're already looking forward to our 21st birthday celebrations next year.  In the meantime, we're taking a short break prior to launching our second winter event at the end of 2015, The Electric Gardens!”

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Recital - From The Golden Age

Saturday June 27, 2015

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Last night, in the beautiful surroundings of Mackintosh Queen’s Cross, I attended a ‘Recital from the Golden Age’, performed by violinist Feargus Hetherington and pianist Edward Cohen. 

A golden age of anything is a period of time looked back on with fond sentiment. For violinist Feargus Hetherington, there was a clear golden age for the violin and piano duo between 1920 - 1939 with many pieces now lost and no longer played in public. Feargus’ goal is to resurrect some of these pieces and bring them, as well as the golden age of violin and piano concerts, back to their former glory. And boy did he ever!

Although not packed out, there was a fair crowd of around 30 at the event which in a way made it feel more exclusive - a sort of private evening with Feargus and Edward as they played their music. The variety of pieces packed out the hour making it seem like much longer in the best of senses. One minute a light-hearted melody which would have been suitable for a mixer on the lawn of the White House and the next a dramatic piece which could have come straight from a black and white tragic film. 

The pieces were played with such conviction, as could be seen in the faces of both musicians, filling the small stage space with enough drama and fervour to keep the audience near enough transfixed for the entire performance. It was incredibly impressive to see two musicians hold a group’s attention so completely for so long! 

A piano and violin recital is not my usual cup of tea, I’ll admit. However, after the performance tonight, I will seek to try out something of a similar caliber in the future. For any who wish to experience a performance in the Mackintosh Queen’s Cross there is A Piano Recital with Peter Seivewright tonight at 7.30pm with tickets available online and at the door.

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Moby Dick - A Play, A Pie and A Pint

Friday June 26, 2015

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Oran Mor’s “A Play, A Pie and A Pint” is a hugely successful lunchtime theatre initiative where visitors – you guessed it – have the chance to see an adaptation of a classic play while enjoying a pie and a pint (or glass of wine or soft drink if you are so inclined). It’s great to see the event continue as part of the West End Festival with its Summer Season of Classic Cuts. This week the feature piece was Harman Melville’s ‘Moby Dick’ which I had the pleasure of seeing yesterday afternoon.

Arriving ten minutes before the performance started, it was already difficult to find a seat among the 60 or so other people there where I could enjoy my pie (meat and vegetarian options available) so my first observation would be to get there early! The performance space consisted of a small runway and stage behind it making for a very intimate-feeling performance no matter where you were sat. As the lights dimmed the three performers who played all of the characters marched in from the rear, singing an old sea shanty and even slipped in a sly nod to Scotland during it. This was met with more than a few chuckles from the crowd.

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The three actors regaled the captivated audience (myself included) with the tale of the white whale and one captain’s insatiable need for revenge against it. All three of them gave powerful performances using very subtle, if any, sound effects and basic props. The transition between narrative and performance was very slick and worked well as part of the 45 minute piece. Despite watching captain Ahab descend further into his destructive obsession with Moby Dick, there were a few light hearted moments which were weaved skilfully into the performance keeping the experience not too intense for a lunch time event.

Moby Dick was incredibly enjoyable to watch at Oran Mor. Great setting, great cast, great play and great pie (although I could have eaten another!) I’m a convert to “A Play, A Pie and A Pint” and will be back to check out whatever takes centre stage next!

Moby Dick will be performed again today (26th June) and tomorrow (27th June) with tickets available online or at the door of Oran Mor. 

Daniel Irwin

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Speaking In Tongues

Thursday June 25, 2015

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Little Bat productions presents: Speaking in Tongues - the story of nine interwoven lives. It deals with the right and wrongs of emotional conduct, of contracts broken between intimates, bonds forged between strangers and the darker aspects of human nature.

Sonja & Leon and Pete & Jane are all happily married. Or so they say. But one night Sonja meets Pete in a bar – they go back to a hotel room.  Leon meets Jane in a bar – they go back to a hotel room.  Is what happens tragic or inevitable?  How well do your really know the one you love?

A woman disappears. But who was the last one to see her alive?  Her husband? Her client? Or the man who finds her shoe in his car? Speaking in Tongues takes you on a journey through a web of deceit, love, lies and death to answer the question ‘Do you truly know the one you love?’

The production company Little Bat Bat is the creation of Meli Bach in collaboration with Simon McCay and Una McDade.

“Little Bat grew out of the need / desire to DO something and not just sit around waiting for someone else to cast us in great roles.  By taking control of ‘making it happen’ we get to cast ourselves and choose projects that challenge us.  When looking for material we wanted stuff that intrigued and captivated us.  When we first read Speaking in Tongues we all thought ‘how are we going to do this?’ That’s all part of the challenge. 

The ability of this play to capture the imagination, to keep people debating and asking questions, is one of the reasons we chose it.  It is brilliant writing and technically quite difficult with simultaneous scenes and overlapping dialogue.”
                                                                                                     - Meli Bach

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Review by Andrew Stewart:

"The recently renovated and elegant Webster’s theatre plays host to the fascinating production by Andrew Bovell, ‘Speaking In Tongues’.   

Meli Bach, Simon McCav, Jessica Phillippi and James J Robson take centre stage in this play about adultery and betrayal.  Opening in a sleazy hotel, we are introduced to the first four characters telling two similar stories at once.  At first this method seems confusing however as the play progresses we see the reason for this clever approach.  As the act continues we learn about the individual characters and their marriage woes.  This initially required intense concentration pays off as the story progresses.  

As the second half begins we are introduced to four more characters played by the same people.  Although again mildly confusing, this device becomes compelling and creates a feeling of pain shared between the characters.  This play is clever as it intertwines everyone’s story and brings about an interesting plot involving a detective, a woman councillor with self-esteem issues and a character who might have been a murderer.  As the plot develops, the audience begin to see how each character connects with one another and with that allows for a unique story about relationships to be told.

During the play there were many different environments including a bar and a hotel.  The clever use of props allowed the audience to feel as if they were in the set environment with the characters.  Working with little space, credit is due to the creative ability in order to make this a success.  With only four actors playing nine different characters the opening night of ‘Speaking In Tongues’ was certainly a hit at the Webster Theatre."

 

Tickets available online through Little Bat Productions for performances today (25th June) and tomorrow (26th June).

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Anne Hardy: Twin Fields Exhibition

Wednesday June 24, 2015

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Anne Hardy’s newest exhibition “Twin Fields” at The Common Guild, an exhibition space for visual arts projects and events, is perhaps one of the more unusual yet brilliant exhibitions you may visit while perusing the fine selection of art events the West End Festival has to offer.

Hardy, a London-based British artist, has had many solo exhibitions since 2004 where she predominantly creates large sets/environments and photographs them to create her art. These sets have been characterised as “hovering between reality and fiction”, and although never featuring people, have been described to have personas and very distinctive feels about them.

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 The current feature piece as part of her newest ‘Twin Fields’ exhibition, is a stand-alone wooden box which you can enter which is fitted almost like a rural cabin in the wilderness. To create the sets, Hardy often ‘comes across’ materials and uses them in her urban scenes. All elements of the set are very carefully chosen and arranged despite their incidental appearance and this is part of the genius behind Hardy and her work. It is also a unique experience to be able to engage with such immersive art through visual, hearing, touch and smell sensations.

 Anne used to create the sets in order to photograph but as she progressed further with creating the environments, they became her art in their own right. The settings for her installations are carefully chosen as they often become part of the exhibit themselves. People who have watched Anne work describe how each piece grows and evolves, manifesting itself in the surrounding studio space. The open and spacious townhouse location for this exhibit beautifully contrasts the enclosed and rustic nature of the set on display. 

 Once exhibits are finished, they are dismantled so experience this unique exhibition while you can! Twin fields will be showing in The Common Guild until the beginning of August. More information on Hardy can be found on her website and at The Common Guild.

 

Daniel Irwin

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RSNO Chorus: Sacred Music

Sunday June 21, 2015

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I sing. I love singing. Ella Fitzgerald said that the only thing better than singing was more singing. We can all do it and should do more of it simply because it makes us happy. I have sung previously for Her Maj and the Queen of Denmark. I've sung in the White House for a US President; in Hong Kong for the last Governor-General; in Ottawa for Canada's parliament and Prime Minister. Singing has taken me to the Sydney Opera House and war-torn Jerusalem, and next year, hopefully, will take me to China.

On Saturday, 27th June, I'll pass a glorious Saturday night with the RSNO Chorus singing Durufle’s Requiem in St Mary's Cathedral on Great Western Road, and I hope you'll be able to join us. You won't be disappointed. Religious choral music can deliver unique spiritual beauty far beyond earthly prejudices.

Durufle's Requiem emerged from the embittering stresses and tensions of Nazi occupied Paris in the early 1940s. It was commissioned by the collaborating Vichy government. But its nine short movements were only completed three years after liberation as Paris made peace with itself to regain its place as the city of light and love.

The 100-strong chorus will be conducted by our recently appointed Musical Director, Gregory Batsleer, and accompanied by Steven McIntyre on the splendid St. Mary’s organ. The programme also provides a trio of beautiful motets by Anton Bruckner.

Whatever this wonderful concert delivers, it underscores Glasgow's prestigious legacy in choral singing. The RSNO Chorus evolved from the Glasgow Choral Union, formed in 1843 to sing the first full performance of Handel’s Messiah in Scotland. Almost 50 years passed before Scotland’s national orchestra was officially founded and chorus and orchestra still perform The Messiah every year on January 2nd.

Remember there are over 100 choral groups in Glasgow and, in this our 20th Festival, there are around 25 singing groups participating – virtually a whole festival in its own right. Glasgow Youth Choir conductor, Audrey McKirdy, ran a magnificent singing workshop for kids over the first WEF2015 weekend at Hillhead Library. That same weekend the City of Glasgow Chorus, directed by Graham Taylor, performed the Faure Requiem, alongside other choral classics, at Hyndland Parish Church.

The Mackintosh Choir, featuring John Rutter, performed to a standing room only audience on 14th June, and, over the past couple of weeks, we’ve enjoyed Gospel, Russian, Chamber, A Cappella, Barbershop and Evensong, as well as the Harry Ensemble from London ….. and still lots more to look forward to .... just as Ella said. The only thing better than singing is more singing.

RSNO Chorus performs Maurice Durufle's Requiem at St Mary's Cathedral, Great Western Road, Glasgow on Saturday June 27th.

 

Liz Scobie, Festival Chairman

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Iain Forbes plus guests 'King of Birds' and 'Chloe Marie'

Saturday June 20, 2015

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Iain has dazzled audiences at many festivals and music venues around the UK with his multi-styled guitar playing from the Royal Concert Hall to the SECC. One reviewer even want as far as to say, “One of the best Guitarists I've ever seen, Iain combines an astonishing talent with a huge range of musical tastes - and a refreshing lack of self-importance”.

So head on down to CC Music tomorrow (21st June) for a special performance by an astonishingly talented guitarist featuring special guests. Supported by song writing brothers ‘King of Birds' and the soulful and majestic 'Chloe Marie'.

To see Iain perform his famous "Weejie Jig" click here

 

 

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Kathakali Comes To Scotland

Tuesday June 16, 2015

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The West End Festival plays host to a rare opportunity presented by the Kala Chethena Kathakali Company to see the elaborate 3-Dimensional Chutti make-up process that transforms the faces of the Kathakali (Indian dance-drama) actors. This is an amazing 500 year old traditional technique applied by the first and only female Chutti artist in the world - Kalamandalam Barbara Vijayakumar.

The display is followed by a bowl of delicious Indian curry with rice, prepared especially by one of the members of the Kathakali Company from Kerala, India

There is also the opportunity for an evening with Kathakali masters featuring chanting, songs, music and a rare opportunity to ask the artists questions. Kathakali means story–play and embraces drama, dance, music, visuals and ritual to create an exotic and visually powerful form of theatre.

Described as “spectacularly beautiful” by the Daily Telegraph, this rare gem of Indian theatre will be sure to add an exotic twist to your festival experience.

Tickets available for make-up demo, food and evening with Kathakali masters from The Scottish Mask and Puppet Centre

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Gaelic - the second hour

Wednesday June 3, 2015

Scottish people have shown an awesome commitment to learning Gaelic, with a view to maintaining this part of their linguistic heritage. But learners often find it hard to get accurate information on how Gaelic works. The workshop 'Gaelic in an Hour!', run by local linguist Derek Rogers in an earlier West End Festival, was a response to this need.

There Derek dealt with such basic features as lenition, pronunciation, and how to build noun-phrases. This time he will get the audience to play some silly word-games, look again at pronunciation, and shine light into a dark corner where verbs lurk.

The workshop is for beginners and experienced speakers alike, and will show that a coherent system lies behind Gaelic's seemingly random difficulties. And it's an interactive workshop, so all participants will chatter bits of Gaelic - no-one escapes without opening their mouth!

And it'll put you in the mood for An Lochran's 'Togaibh Fonn!', later the same three days.

Free event. Wellington Church, Southpark Avenue.

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The little leftover mermaid - 8 & 9 June

Monday June 2, 2014

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Strident is the merman King of the Ocean:
Son of the almighty sea-god ,Poseidon .
Strident lived  happily with his daughter, Sirenetta ,
Whose voice charmed anyone who'd ever met her,
But Sirenetta was a restless adolesent 
With a personality most effervescent,
And she wanted to explore the world above water-
She fancied herself as a Royal globetrotter!
On her very first evening above the waves,
She saved a handsome prince from a watery grave ,
And with Prince Charmless she became enthralled.
Her father King Strident was quite appalled
And warned her against this unhealthy passion,
But Sirenetta ignored him in true teenage fashion !
She went to the seawitch, a distant relation,
Who was banished from Atlantis for eating crustaceans .
The seawitch, Jezibaba, prepared her a spell,
But Sirenetta had to give up her voice as well .
When Jezibaba sang with the mermaid's voice
Charmless made it clear Jezibaba was his choice .
Sirenetta couldn't stand by-she had to rebel
For if truth be told, she's a feisty mademoiselle,
And it all ended happily,what happened you say?
Well, you will have to come and see it on performance day!

Tickets from 0141-778-2145/
Capricorniche@gmail.com
or at the door: The Tall Ship 8th/9th June  7.30.p.m.
£9/£7 concession 
Disabled access
Wheelchair access pre-bookable

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