Gaelic: The Second Hour!

Thursday June 18, 2015

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The event was located in Wellington Church, providing a graceful and elegant atmosphere for the workshop.

Upon entry I sat down with a mixed crowd of young and old interested in honing their language techniques.  Derek advised me that although my knowledge in Gaelic was minimal I would be able to gain something from this event.  Titled ‘Second stage mutations in the dependant mood’ this presentation considered the use of verbs with handouts to go along.

 A gentle step by step approach with audience participation ensured that no one could escape without getting involved.  This technique allowed each person to tune their pronunciation in a warm and encouraging atmosphere.   With word games and audience engagement this ensured a proactive approach into learning the fascinating language of Gaelic and within twenty minutes of the presentation I found myself speaking Gaelic.  I believe that anyone with an interest in language studies or Gaelic would benefit from Derek’s approach.

With Derek’s passion for teaching language and unique style of delivery, I found myself not only enjoying the event but learning Gaelic in a short period of time and before I knew it the session was over.  As the workshop concluded I was able to differentiate between verbs and speak various phrases of Gaelic, something that very morning I never thought would happen.  After the workshop concluded I spoke to Derek and it was clear to me the passion he has for his art and I would encourage people of all levels to attend.

No stranger to the West End Festival, Derek has been providing workshops and presentations since 1999.  As a language and accent specialist, his work with the WEF has a varied over the years.  His first workshop discussed the difference between Scottish and English accents and continued the following year.  In 2001 he discussed the Polish language and more recently in 2013 he discussed the language of Mandarin with simple conversation.  In future WEF events he told me he is looking into discussing the ways in which politicians use language to cosy up to voters which is sure to be of interest to many.

If you didn’t get the chance to attend Gaelic: The Second Hour there will be another presentation at Wellington Church on the 23rd of June at 1:00pm (FREE ENTRY).

To find out more information and future workshops by Dereck here.

 

Andrew Stewart

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Guest Post - Glasgow Islay Gaelic Choir

Monday June 24, 2013

Glasgow Islay Gaelic Choir 1


The Glasgow Islay Gaelic Choir date back to 1944 and while in the immediate post-war years many of the members would have had connections with the home island, today’s members have backgrounds in both Gaelic and non Gaelic speaking areas of Scotland and even beyond.

Over the years the choir has had considerable success particularly at the Royal National Mod, winning the Lovat and Tullibardine Shield on 10 occasions with particular success in Skye in 1982 when they won all 4 competitions.  They have also tasted success at the Pan Celtic Festival in Ireland and at the Vancouver Mod and the Choir has been invited to sing at the Eistedfodd and the International Eistedfodd.  Over many years the choir had a strong relationship with the Gaelic group Runrig, appearing with them on many occasions, and in 1996 they produced a “Tribute to Runrig.”

The choir is renowned for its perfect tone and the emotions of sadness and joy that their music produces, moving native speakers and non Gaelic speakers to tears.  All of which is down to the musical expertise of their well known conductor Kirsteen Grant.

The choir will be performing at the West End Festival on Wednesday 26 June at Hyndland Parish Church. Tickets are £8 at the door and for more information please visit the facebook page or call 0141 942 7603.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Guest blog post by Robert McNair, Glasgow Islay Gaelic Choir

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